Watch Steven Spielberg’s fascinating interview on 60 Minutes

Steven Spielberg has changed movies profoundly. He, and Jaws, are the reason we even have summer blockbusters. He also has put together a huge collection of memorable movies. Jaws, Jurassic Park, E.T., Schindler’s List, Close Encounters – the list goes on forever. Everyone has a favorite Spielberg film.

But what makes the man tick? 60 Minutes had an interview with him on Sunday to try to find out. Although Spielberg fans probably have a good idea of what’s going on in his head, and most film buffs, it’s nice to hear a more mainstream source explore it. His movies come from his childhood, as the interview points out. In fact, you can see his relationship with his father through time in his films. As Spielberg admits, his earlier films feature deadbeat dads at a time when he had a strained relationship with his dad. He blamed his dad for his parents’ divorce, even though it was his mother’s fault.

Then, while he was repairing his relationship with his dad, you can see him using respectable and hero father figures in his movies. Most notably using Tom Cruise as a deadbeat dad who has a sort of redemption in War of the Worlds. Schindler’s List (he was ashamed of being Jewish when he was younger) and the upcoming Lincoln (that’s his hero) also have roots in his childhood.

Another interesting note is that he mentions he’s tired of action.

I knew I could do the action in my sleep at this point in my career. In my life, the action doesn’t hold any — it doesn’t attract me anymore.

This comes across in War Horse. Despite the fact that the film takes place during World War I, there’s very little action going on. Same with Lincoln — the movie focuses on political dealings rather than the Civil War. His next movie is Robopocalypse, which is supposed to be an action movie about a robot uprising. It’s likely that Spielberg will focus more on the drama rather than any robot on human killing or war.

If you’ve been touched by a Spielberg film at all, you owe it to yourself to check out this interview. It’s only 14 minutes long. [via /Film]

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